Connect with us

COVID-19

Omicron less severe than Delta but still poses danger for unvaccinated: WHO

Published

 on

(Last Updated On: January 13, 2022)

The highly infectious Omicron coronavirus variant causes less severe disease than the Delta strain but it remains a “dangerous virus”, particularly for those who are unvaccinated, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday.

Speaking at a news briefing, director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said more than 90 countries were yet to meet the target of vaccinating 40% of their populations and more than 85% of people in Africa were yet to receive a single dose, Reuters reported.

“We mustn’t allow this virus a free ride or wave the white flag, especially when so many people around the globe remain unvaccinated,” he said.

In its weekly epidemiological report on Tuesday, the WHO said cases increased by 55%, or 15 million, in the week to Jan. 9 from a week earlier – by far the most cases reported in a single week, read the report.

“This huge spike in infections is being driven by the Omicron variant, which is rapidly replacing Delta in almost all countries,” Tedros said.

He said the majority of people hospitalized around the world with COVID-19 were unvaccinated and that if transmission was not curtailed there was greater risk of another variant emerging that could be even more transmissible, and more deadly, than Omicron.

COVID-19

India sees surge in new COVID-19 infections

Published

on

(Last Updated On: June 23, 2022)

India’s ministry of health on Thursday reported they have seen a surge in COVID-19 cases in the country in the past 24 hours.

According to the health ministry, 13,313 new cases were recorded in the last 24 hours, compared to 12,249 cases on Wednesday.

According to the Ministry, 10,972 people have recovered from the infection which took the total number of recoveries to over 42 million.

With the recorded cases, India’s active caseload now stands at 83,990.

The ministry also said 38 people have died in the last 24 hours due to the infection, taking the total number of deaths to 524,941.

Continue Reading

COVID-19

Research finds women more likely than men to suffer from long COVID

Published

on

(Last Updated On: June 22, 2022)

Women are far more likely than men to suffer from long COVID, a review, published Tuesday in the journal Current Medical Research and Opinion, stated.

The study led by Shirley Sylvester, senior medical director for women’s health at Johnson & Johnson in New Brunswick, New Jersey in the US included 1.3 million patients, and found women were 22 percent more likely to develop persistent symptoms after a COVID-19 infection than men.

For women, lingering symptoms after a COVID-19 infection included fatigue; ear, nose and throat issues; as well as mood disorders like depression. They also had respiratory symptoms, and neurological, skin, gastrointestinal and rheumatic disorders.

In contrast, men with long COVID were more likely to have endocrine disorders, including diabetes and kidney issues, the study found.

The study also found that patients with diabetes may be up to four times more likely to develop long COVID.

The researchers noted that differences in how men’s and women’s immune systems function could be an important factor.

According to Sylvester and her team, the Omicron variant was less likely than Delta to cause long COVID.

Continue Reading

COVID-19

G20 targets raising $1.5 billion for global pandemic fund, says host Indonesia

Published

on

(Last Updated On: June 20, 2022)

The Group of 20 (G20) major economies aims to raise $1.5 billion this year for a fund set up to better prepare for future pandemics, the health minister of current G20 president Indonesia said on Friday.

G20 countries have provisionally agreed to set up a multi-billion dollar fund that health officials have said will finance efforts like surveillance, research, and better access to vaccination for lower-to-middle income countries, among others. 

Indonesian Health Minister Budi Gunadi Sadikin said in an interview the United States, European Union, Indonesia, Singapore and Germany have pledged about $1.1 billion to the fund so far.

“If we can get by the end of this year $1.5 billion of fresh funding, we will be very, very happy,” he told Reuters, adding he hopes the group can raise another $1.5 billion next year.

Indonesia will host the G20 leaders summit in Bali in November.

The World Bank, which will house the fund, and the World Health Organization (WHO), which is advising on the facility, estimated in a report that the annual funding gap for pandemic preparedness is $10.5 billion.

Budi said he will start discussing contributions to the fund with countries like Japan and Britain at a G20 health ministers meeting in Indonesia next week.

“Pandemic is a war, and we have to be ready with enough money when war happens,” he said.

The United States and Indonesia have been pushing for the establishment of the fund to help the world be better prepared to tackle future pandemics, but the WHO has been concerned the fund could undermine its own efforts and those of other global health mechanisms.

But Budi said the WHO will play “a leadership role” in identifying which countries would need the fund or provide other countermeasures.

The World Bank has said the fund is expected to be operational this year, and Budi said the structure for the fund could be established in a few months’ time.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2022 Ariana News. All rights reserved!