Connect with us

World

Putin blasts West, says world faces most dangerous decade since WW2

Published

on

(Last Updated On: October 28, 2022)

President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday that the world faced the most dangerous decade since World War Two as Western elites scrambled to prevent the inevitable crumbling of the global dominance of the United States and its allies, Reuters reported.

In one of his longest public appearances since he sent troops into Ukraine on Feb. 24, Putin signaled he had no regrets about what he calls “a special operation” and accused the West of inciting the war and of playing a “dangerous, bloody and dirty” game that was sowing chaos across the world.

“The historical period of the West’s undivided dominance over world affairs is coming to an end,” Putin, Russia’s paramount leader, told the Valdai Discussion Club during a session entitled “A Post-Hegemonic World: Justice and Security for Everyone”.

“We are standing at a historical frontier: Ahead is probably the most dangerous, unpredictable and, at the same time, important decade since the end of World War Two.”

The 70-year-old former KGB spy was more than an hour late to the meeting of Russia experts where he gave a typically scathing interpretation of what he portrayed as Western decadence and decline in the face of rising Asian powers such as China.

He appeared relaxed over more than three and a half hours as he was questioned about fears of nuclear war, his relations with President Xi Jinping, and about how he felt about Russian soldiers killed in the Ukraine war, which he cast “partly” as a civil war, a notion Kyiv rejects.

Tens of thousands of people have been killed in the war, while the West has imposed the most severe sanctions in history on Russia, one of the world’s biggest suppliers of natural resources.

The Russian leader blamed the West for stoking recent nuclear tensions, citing remarks by former British Prime Minister Liz Truss about her readiness to use London’s nuclear deterrent if the circumstances demanded it.

He repeated an assertion that Ukraine could detonate a “dirty bomb” laced with radioactive material to frame Moscow – an allegation dismissed by Kyiv and the West as false and without evidence.

A suggestion by Kyiv that the Russian charge might mean Moscow plans to detonate such a device itself was false, he said.

“We don’t need to do that. There would be no sense whatsoever in doing that,” Putin said, adding that the Kremlin had responded to what it felt was nuclear blackmail by the West.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has triggered the biggest confrontation with the West since the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis in the depths of the Cold War when the Soviet Union and the United States came closest to nuclear war.

But he said Russia’s military doctrine was defensive and, asked about the Cuban Missile crisis, quipped that he had no desire to be in the place of Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet leader who, along with John F. Kennedy, took the world to the brink of nuclear war before defusing the situation.

“No way. No, I can’t imagine myself in the role of Khrushchev,” Putin said.

Putin quoted a 1978 Harvard lecture by Russian dissident and novelist Alexander Solzhenitsyn, who launched a frontal assault on Western civilisation, decrying the hollow materialism and “the blindness of superiority” of the West.

“Power over the world is what the so-called West has put on the line in its game – but the game is dangerous, bloody and I would say dirty,” said Putin. “The sower of the wind, as they say, will reap the storm.”

Putin said he thought constantly of Russian casualties in Ukraine, but avoided getting into detail about what the West says are huge losses. But only Russia could guarantee the territorial integrity of Ukraine, he said.

Ultimately, Putin said, the West would have to talk to Russia and other major powers about the future of the world.

 

World

Voters in many countries sceptical of democracy, poll shows

Published

on

(Last Updated On: April 12, 2024)

Voters in many countries are suffering a crisis of faith in their democracies and institutions, a survey by a governance watchdog showed, painting a bleak picture in a year in which more than half of the world’s population holds elections.

With the United States, India, Britain and the European Union going to the polls in 2024, the report published on Thursday by the International Institute of Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA) offers a sombre snapshot of the perceived health of many democracies.

The results show that voters in 11 of the 19 countries surveyed, which included the U.S. and India, fewer than half of the people believed the most recent election was free and fair.

Only voters in Denmark believed courts ‘always’ or ‘often’ provide access to justice, while in 8 of 19 countries, more people had favourable views of “a strong leader who doesn’t have to bother with parliament or elections” than had unfavourable views.”Democracies must respond to the scepticism of their public, both by improving governance and by combating the growing culture of disinformation that has fostered false accusations against credible elections,” International IDEA Secretary-General Kevin Casas-Zamora said in a statement.

This year’s presidential election in the United States is likely to see incumbent Democrat Joe Biden face off again against ex-president Donald Trump, who falsely claimed widespread voter fraud when he lost the presidency in 2020.

The survey showed that only 47 per cent of respondents in the United States expressed faith that the country had credible electoral processes.

Elections for Europe’s parliament which take place in June could see big gains for the far-right and impact policy from support for Ukraine in its war against Russia’s full-scale invasion to measures to address climate change.

In February, the parliament condemned what it called Russian attempts to undermine European democracy.

The survey, conducted between July 2023 and January 2024, polled about 1,500 people in each of 19 countries including Brazil, Chile, Colombia, The Gambia, Iraq, Italy, Lebanon, Lithuania, Pakistan, Romania, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Korea and Tanzania.

 

(Reuters)

Continue Reading

World

One dead, five wounded in Washington shooting

Published

on

(Last Updated On: April 11, 2024)

A man has been killed and five others, including two children, injured after a shooting in Washington.

The shooting happened in the Carver Langston neighborhood on Wednesday night, Metropolitan Police Department Chief Pamela Smith said.

Investigators believe the suspects got out of a vehicle and began shooting into a crowd of people on the street.

One man was killed while two men, a woman and a nine-year-old were taken by ambulance to local hospitals.

A 12-year-old later arrived at a hospital with a gunshot wound and is also believed to be a victim in the shooting, Smith said.

The District of Columbia is struggling with a sharp increase in violent crime, which went up 39 percent in 2023.

The increase was largely fuelled by a 35 percent rise in homicides and growth in carjackings, which nearly doubled.

Smith has pushed US politicians to pass legislation that would strengthen penalties for gun offenses in Washington.

Continue Reading

World

Three sons of Hamas leader Haniyeh killed in Israeli airstrike

Published

on

(Last Updated On: April 11, 2024)

Three sons of Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh were killed in an Israeli airstrike in the Gaza Strip on Wednesday, the Palestinian Islamist group and Haniyeh’s family said.

The Israeli military confirmed carrying out the attack, describing the three sons as operatives in the Hamas armed wing, Reuters reported.

The three sons – Hazem, Amir and Mohammad – were killed when the car they were driving in was bombed in Gaza’s Al-Shati camp, Hamas said. Four of Haniyeh’s grandchildren, three girls and a boy, were also killed in the attack, Hamas said.

Asked about the four grandchildren killed in the airstrike, the Israeli military said there was “no information on that right now.”

Haniyeh, based abroad in Qatar, has been the tough-talking face of Hamas’ international diplomacy as war with Israel has raged on in Gaza, where his family home was destroyed in an Israeli airstrike back in November.

“The blood of my sons is not dearer than the blood of our people,” Haniyeh, 61, who has 13 sons and daughters according to Hamas sources, told pan-Arab Al Jazeera TV.

The three sons and four grandchildren were making family visits during the first day of Eid al-Fitr in Shati, their home refugee camp in Gaza City, according to relatives.

Hamas said on Tuesday it was studying an Israeli ceasefire proposal in the more than six-month-old Gaza war but that it was “intransigent” and met none of the Palestinian demands.

“Our demands are clear and specific and we will not make concessions on them. The enemy will be delusional if it thinks that targeting my sons, at the climax of the negotiations and before the movement sends its response, will push Hamas to change its position,” Haniyeh said.

In the seventh month of a war in which Israel’s air and ground offensive has devastated Gaza, Hamas wants an end to Israeli military operations and a withdrawal from the enclave, and permission for displaced Palestinians to return home, Reuters reported.

Haniyeh’s eldest son confirmed in a Facebook post that his three brothers were killed. “Thanks to God who honoured us by the martyrdom of my brothers, Hazem, Amir and Mohammad and their children,” wrote Abdel-Salam Haniyeh.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2022 Ariana News. All rights reserved!